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Pharmacological Inhibition of FGFR1 Signaling Attenuates the Progression of Tail Regeneration in the Northern House Gecko Hemidactylus flaviviridis

Anusree Pillai1, Isha Desai2, and Suresh Balakrishnan1
1. Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara- 390 002, India
2. Department of Bioscience, NVPAS, Anand- 388 120, India
Abstract—Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) is one of the key modulators of epimorphic regeneration. The current study was focused on investigating the role of FGF2 signaling in reptilian regeneration, a poorly explored amniote model system to study epimorphosis. FGF2 signaling pathway was targeted via inhibition of FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) using the pharmacological inhibitor SU5402. Morphometric studies revealed that FGF2 is important for wound healing and initial proliferative activities leading to differentiation, as both these processes were found hampered in SU5402 treated animals. However, the late differentiation was found independent of FGF2 signaling. Further, a careful observation on the histological profile of the regenerates was done to understand the effect of impaired FGF2 signaling on the tissue differentiation and restoration. It was apparent from the study that the ablation of FGF2 signal hampers important processes of epimorphosis like formation of a wound epithelium, recruitment of blastemal cells and their further proliferation and differentiation, all of which eventually lead to restoration of the lost appendage. Conclusively therefore, FGF2 seems to be a necessary molecule for successful reptilian regeneration and could be an essential requirement for appendage regeneration across varied classes of vertebrates which exhibit epimorphosis. 

Index Terms—SU5402 epimorphic regeneration, FGF2, hemidactylus flaviviridis

Cite: Anusree Pillai, Isha Desai, and Suresh Balakrishnan, "Pharmacological Inhibition of FGFR1 Signaling Attenuates the Progression of Tail Regeneration in the Northern House Gecko Hemidactylus flaviviridis," International Journal of Life Sciences Biotechnology and Pharma Research, Vol. 2, No. 4, pp. 263-278, October 2013.
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